The Effect of Low Intensity Steady State Cardio


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The Effect of Low Intensity Steady State Cardio – Thomas DeLauer

beta-oxidation is the catabolic process by which fatty acid molecules are broken down in the cytosol in prokaryotes and in the mitochondria in eukaryotes to generate acetyl-CoA

During fatty acid beta oxidation long chain acyl-CoA molecules – the main components of FA’s – are broken to acetyl-CoA molecules

How fatty acids are broken down and used to generate ATP

Fatty acids provide highly efficient energy storage, delivering more energy per gram than carbs

In tissues with high energy requirement, such as heart, up to 50–70% of energy, in the form of ATP production, comes from fatty acid (FA) beta-oxidation

During fatty acid β-oxidation long chain acyl-CoA molecules – the main components of FAs – are broken to acetyl-CoA molecules

Fatty acid transport into mitochondria

Fatty acids are activated for degradation by conjugation with coenzyme A (CoA) in the cytosol

The long-chain fatty-acyl-CoA is then modified by carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) to acylcarnitine and transported across the inner mitochondrial membrane by carnitine translocase (CAT)

CPT2 then converts the long chain acylcarnitine back to long-chain acyl-CoA before beta-oxidation (1,2)

Low Intensity

LISS is a low-intensity cardio workout that calls for typically 30 to 60 minutes – roughly 60% of maximal heart-rate effort

The aerobic system kicks in when the muscles cannot create enough energy without the aid of oxygen – although this system uses blood glucose and glycogen, it can also burn fat as well, yielding us the most ATP out of any macronutrient

The only problem is that the aerobic system is the slowest of all energy systems and may not predominantly burn fat at first

The oxidation of a single fatty acid molecule may yield over a hundred molecules of ATP

The oxidation of a single molecule of glucose, or blood sugar, yields only about 36 molecules of ATP (1,2)

References

1) Fat Oxidation During Exercise. (2012, November 2). Retrieved from

2) Fatty acid beta oxidation | Abcam. (2018, March 5). Retrieved from